Mood

25 02, 2018

Are you living your life to the fullest?

By | 2018-02-25T21:48:37+00:00 February 25th, 2018|Everyday Life, General, Lifestyle, Mood|0 Comments

Man. Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money. Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health. And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present. The result being that he does not live in the present or the future. He lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived. – The 14th Dalai Lama

6 01, 2017

Dying. Slowly.

By | 2017-01-15T11:22:05+00:00 January 6th, 2017|Mood|0 Comments

The environment has a huge impact on your feelings, health, self-esteem and happiness overall. The people you interact with determine the way you live your life. They can make you feel inspired, or they can as well bring you down. “If you’re the smartest person in the room, you’re in the wrong room.” You should progress in life and keep growing. If you stick around people who do not inspire/challenge you, then you will stagnate - which is like slowly dying. “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with” - Jim Rohn By surrounding [...]

4 07, 2016

Don’t Treat Developers as Interchangeable Widgets

By | 2017-01-15T11:20:02+00:00 July 4th, 2016|Mood|0 Comments

Management likes to reduce risks by treating developers as interchangeable widgets. The silly approach which has been introduced as a revolutionary, agile “achievement” expects that all developers are familiar with all areas of code. The goal is to minimize the loss when any individual leaves the team. Well, this is the worst possible way to approach software development. First and foremost: why does the management think that programmers are going to leave the company? If people are indeed leaving the company, then this is the issue that must be fixed. And expecting that all developers can be experts in all areas of [...]

26 08, 2015

Eat Your Own Dog Food

By | 2017-01-24T10:16:06+00:00 August 26th, 2015|Mood|0 Comments

Building software frameworks is a great thing; frameworks encapsulate and hide the complexity required to solve problems while exposing only the bare minimum functionality in an easy to use manner. So far so good, yet there is a core issue which I faced several times during my career: The ones who design and develop these frameworks rarely use them. In other words, they do not eat their own dog food. With the exception of a couple of minimalistic sample apps and unit tests(*), framework creators almost never use in real applications the stuff they've built. (*)Even worse, those samples and unit tests are written by another team. I [...]